Under a Lamppost

Deep and meaningful.

Broken Writer

“How could this be?” He gasped and drew in his breathe. “How could this be,” he said again. With each breath, his voice became angrier filled with remorse. “How could this be!”

Emad did not notice the little girl wearing a red jumper, hiding beneath the shadow of his demise. Her eyes caught a wisp of regret and held in her breathe, unlike the man’s, but more so of utter sorrow.

Why would Emad who not a moment ago was dancing alongside happiness, turn against the world? Why was it easy for him to let go of every moment and lean toward hatred?

The little girl crouched and squinted her eyes to see better in the dimly lit corridor.

It began to sprinkle and soft raindrops kissed her cheeks gently stroking away her tears.

She noticed his hands were rough and large. Perhaps a laborer who toiled in the sun. But…

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15 Tips for Choosing a Good Line Editor

Excellent from the wonderfully talented and bestseller author, dear friend Dionne Lister! xoxo

Dionne Lister - Author

Finding a good line editor (or any editor) is one of the trickiest things about being an indie author. Bad editing has caused readers to close a book, never to return, and it’s caused authors to scream in frustration and cry when they realize, after forking out hundreds or even thousands of dollars, their editor didn’t actually know how to use a colon, even though they were apparently one themselves.

If you’re an author who doesn’t think they need an editor or who makes the excuse ‘I don’t have enough money to pay for one,’ you can leave now. If you don’t want to put out a good quality product when you expect people to PAY for your books, you’re unprofessional and obviously don’t care about the reading experience, let alone take writing seriously. Now that all those people are out of the way, I’ll get to why I’m writing this post.

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You may not have heard of Michiyo Yasuda, but you know her work

Beyond Sanity Publishing

Spirited Away

Michiyo Yasuda, the artist who coloured some of Studio Ghibli’s greatest films, has died at the age of 77.

She worked with iconic animator Hayao Miyazaki on 13 animated productions including My Neighbour Totoro and Howl’s Moving Castle.

Her work helped Spirited Away win best animated feature at the 2003 Oscars.

She retired in 2008 but returned to work with Studio Ghibli on 2013’s historical drama, The Wind Rises.

Kiki's Delivery Service

Yasuda first worked with Hayao Miyazaki in 1968 on The Great Adventure of Horus, Prince of the Sun, when the two were employed by Japanese animation studio Toei Doga.

Hayao Miyazaki founded Studio Ghibli in 1985 and Michiyo worked with the company from the start, leading the studio’s colour department.

Ghibli has been celebrated for using hand-drawn elements in their productions, long after digital animation became the norm in animation (although their movies have been coloured digitally).

Howl's Moving Castle

She spoke of her…

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Gallery

The Lens Inside

Intriguing. ^^

static

“I don’t take photographs outside.” This, the most revealing answer of my interview with French photographer and inmate, Ralph. His black and white photos are raw, beautiful, and oddly the most pure depictions that I’ve ever seen. Free from pretense, judgement, and opportunistic voyeurism.

*Why did you initially start taking photographs inside of prison?

Ralph: First, for distraction then as challenge and over time it has become witness.

*Why black and white?

Ralph: Because there is no color.

*Who or what is your most interesting subjects?

Ralph: I love the “dirty faces”. I love the faces that tell a story. Faces sweaty and suffering, that’s my favorite subject.

*Have you taken any photographs outside of prison?

Ralph: I never take pictures outside.

*Is photography a distraction or a reminder of where you are?

Ralph: I’ve frequented the prison for more than 25 years. This is a very big part of…

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Let Writers Love.

Beyond Sanity Publishing

Don’t let a writer fall in love with you if you’re afraid of the attention.

Because they will notice everything – the way you wrinkle your forehead when completely clueless about something. How you absentmindedly scratch your knee when furiously scribbling notes. The soft sigh that escapes your lips when you lean back on your pillow, tired after a day’s work. They will notice the slightest of purrs that emanates from you as you pull a blanket over your body, and the softest of smiles in which your left dimple flashes merrily.

Don’t let a writer fall in love with you if you’re apprehensive of taking care.

They will be emotional – dramatic too, sometimes to the extent of driving you crazy. But don’t lose your cool when, and not if, they do that when you two fight. Look into their eyes and see past the heightened emotions within…

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Let me fly

Beautiful dear. : D

Areeba Noor

llll   

 If you hold me tight, I might die.
Trust me and let me fly.
Give me just one chance by letting me fly.
You are afraid of thunder and I am afraid of not-to-fly.
Don’t trap me in a cage, I have wings to fly.
I have no map but trust me I will come back to you only.
My wings are blessings, I want to fly.
If you love me, let me fly.
The sky is clear, my peeps are calling me, hope you understand, please! Let me fly.
I too have a heart, secretly wishes to fly; my only dream is to fly.

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